Operan II

Operan II

A wave, although this looks rather abstract as a result of my scrunching of the canvas. Same technique as the previous two, very diluted acrylic paint applied wet on wet in many layers. I was lucky in that I could use the fantastic space of Brevens Hjärta (https://www.facebook.com/www.brevenshjarta.se/) and be able to move the comparatively large canvas around on the floor in order to force the paint to run and settle where I wanted it to. The building is old with an uneven floor so tilting the canvas just so was acheived by inserting brushes of various sizes under the board onto which the canvas was stapled. I found that the paint separated into layers of pigment so coming back in the morning to inspect the result of the drying process was exciting!

Operan III

The first Operan is about 120×100 cm and as I was enjoing working on this large scale I did a couple more and found another photograph from the Stockholm archipelage that inspired me. Looking at this image it is almost too colourful – but I have not made any ‘improvements’ – it is the way light is falling on the microscopic pigment particles and the way they are reflecting the light that make it so vibrant. Photographing this using my phone was a challenge – either the light was bouncing off the surface or, as here, the colours look exaggerated and fake.

Being

Staying in my comfort zone of graphite …. although most of these new works in this series are a slight deviation from my usual ‘fur’ works which seem to be hard to step a way from.

Having listened to a lot of artists’ interviews on the net it is clear that most of us make some initial marks, be it planned or experimental, and then we just follow the demands of the work. Beckett saw art as an act of translation and Barnett Newman said ‘one cannot really say it – one can only paint it’. I’ve also come across the view that art is a place for expression, and especially for the expression of that which we are less clear about. So this is what the images are – something that wants to be communicated in this way. Sharp edges and soft layers finding that they are part of the same unit.

Clouds

What it says on the tin! Inspired by a photo taken in the archipelago on the east coast of Sweden, and trying not to think of Turner’s mastery, this what the end finished product looks like. The colours seem un-naturally bright but are actually somewhat toned down. I think I most like what I did with the sea, it sort of balances the activity going on above.

Oil on canvas.